Blu-ray Releases Details
Minding the Gap - Criterion Collection

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This title will be released on January 12, 2021. Pre-order now.
  • Note To Viewer

    This disc has not yet been reviewed. The following information has been provided by the distributor.

Genres: Documentary
Starring: Keire Johnson, Bing Liu, Zack Mulligan
Director: Bing Liu
Plot Synopsis:

This extraordinary debut from documentarian Bing Liu weaves a story of skateboarding, friendship, and fathers and sons into a coming-of-age journey of courageous vulnerability. Over the course of several years and with his camera always at the ready, Liu records the rocky paths into adulthood of Keire and Zack, two friends from his own skateboarding community in Rockford, Illinois. As he does so, deeper parallels gradually emerge that ultimately draw the filmmaker into a heartrending confrontation with his own past. With an eye for images of exhilarating poetry and a keen emotional sensitivity, Minding the Gap is a powerfully cathartic portrait of fledgling lives forged in trauma and fighting to break free.

  • Release Details
    Release Date: January 12th, 2021
    MPAA Rating: Not Rated
    Movie Release Year: 2018
    Release Country: United States
    Movie Studio: Criterion Collection
  • Technical Specs
    Length:93 Minutes
    Specs:Blu-ray Disc
    Video Resolution/Codec:1080p AVC/MPEG-4
    Aspect Ratio(s):1.78:1
    Audio Formats:English: DTS-HD MA 5.1
    Subtitles/Captions:English SDH
    Special Features:
    • New audio commentary featuring Liu and documentary subjects Keire Johnson and Zack Mulligan
    • New follow-up conversation between Liu and documentary subject Nina Bowgren
    • New programs featuring interviews with professional skateboarder Tony Hawk and with Liu, Minding the Gap executive producer Gordon Quinn, and producer Diane Quon
    • Four outtake scenes with introductions by Liu
    • Nuoc (2010), a short film by Liu about two Vietnamese immigrants growing up American
    • Trailer
    • PLUS: An essay by critic Jay Caspian Kang