Blu-ray
Must Own
5 stars
Overall Grade
5 stars

(click linked text below to jump to related section of the review)

The Movie Itself
5 Stars
HD Video Quality
4.5 Stars
HD Audio Quality
4 Stars
Supplements
4.5 Stars
High-Def Extras
5 Stars
Bottom Line
Must Own

The Twilight Zone: Season 1 (1959)

Street Date:
September 14th, 2010
Reviewed by:
Review Date: 1
September 9th, 2010
Movie Release Year:
1959
Studio:
Image Entertainment
Length:
930 Minutes
MPAA Rating:
Unrated
Release Country
United States

The Movie Itself: Our Reviewer's Take

You know a TV show is a classic when it's around 50 years later and you still want to watch every single episode over and over. Rod Serling's 'Twilight Zone' is as classic as television comes. Premiering in 1959, Serling took audiences on trips of the mind and imagination that, at that time, were never thought possible. From Sci-fi, to horror, and even a few episodes that could be considered fantasy here and there 'Twilight Zone' is one of the few shows that can still capture the imagination after so much time has already passed.

Most TV shows follow around the same characters doing the same things. That's partly why the 'Twilight Zone always felt so fresh and new. Each week was a new story, a new set of characters, and new circumstances. Some of them were very serious like in "Walking Distance" when Martin Sloan suddenly finds himself back in time in his hometown. Others had very comedic and light-hearted overtones, like the episode "Escape Clause," where a hypochondriac makes a deal with the devil for immortality.

Each and every story has something to say about the human condition, something deep within the recesses of our own minds and hearts. What would we do if we were thrust back in time to find out what made us happy? Would we go completely nuts if we were left on an asteroid miles from Earth for a crime we didn't commit?

Serling's stories always captured perfectly, a single human emotion that made it easy to relate to the characters in the story. In the "Sixteen Millimeter Shrine" a lovely actress battles with her pride as she's no longer the sexy starlet she once was. "Where is Everybody" features a man combating loneliness as he finds out the city he's in is completely deserted.

Such simple characters, with simple yet strong emotions. That's what the 'Twilight Zone was best at conveying. That's what keeps everyone coming back for more, even 50 years later. I know that's what keeps me coming back. The stories transcend time. Sure some of the futuristic stuff in "The Lonely" looks hokey by today's standard, but the production design and special effects were never the centerpiece of a 'Twilight Zone' episode. The human struggle with internal emotions always took center stage. Nowadays we're bombarded by movies and TV shows that have us ogling at the latest and greatest in CGI, leaving little to be discovered about the actual characters that populate the show. The 'Twilight Zone' allowed us, in a mere half an hour, to become acquainted with a new person, and feel for their plight.

'The Twilight Zone' is the quintessential character driven drama. We feel for these characters mostly because we've had the same types of feelings they're having. The way Serling tapped into the human consciousness is still one of the crowning achievements of TV.

It's wonderful to see Serling's classic show brought to new life on Blu-ray. Now we can all enjoy these original stories in high definition. It's true I've done nothing but praise the show throughout this review, but after such a long time 'The Twilight Zone' still has a hold on people. That counts for a lot. Let's hope for all of our sakes, Image Entertainment sees the value in releasing each and every season of this show, so we don't get stuck owning only two or three seasons on Blu-ray.

'The Twilight Zone' is infinitely rewatchable. You can revisit it any time, even if it's your favorite episodes over and over, and get something new from it. I just flat out love the show!

The Blu-ray: Vital Disc Stats

The set comes packaged in a nice sturdy keepcase that has swinging arms inside that hold four discs back to back, while the fifth disc is inset with a disc hub in the back. As far as I'm concerned all TV seasons should come with this exact same packaging. It's easy to get discs in and out, and you don't feel like you're going to break them (take note Universal!).

The set comes complete with 5 50GB Blu-ray Discs. A pamphlet is included that you'll definitely want to keep. It's thin paper, which is a shame because over time it will become worn, but for right now it looks good. It gives each episode name, a synopsis of the episode, when it originally aired, and the special features you can expect to experience with each episode. It's a great guide to a great set. A cardboard slipcover is also provided, but it has the exact same artwork as the Blu-ray case has, so no surprises there. Each episode features Rod Serling's preview for the next episode, which I thought was really nice to have. Each disc also has a Play All feature.

The Video: Sizing Up the Picture

If you're a real 'Twilight Zone' fan and you picked up the DVD versions when they came out take a minute and pop those in. Check out the video quality. They're not bad, but still, they could use a lot of work, especially in the contrast and detail departments. Now stick in the Blu-rays. Compare them. You'll be able to see right off the bat that you're getting an astounding visual upgrade. Absolutely astounding.

Remastered from the original film negatives, these Blu-rays feature crisp and clear 1080p detail, the likes of which you've never seen before during this show. Where the DVD contrast was totally blown up out of control, here the image is filled with subtle shades of gray that add perfect depth and dimensionality to the picture. With this remastering also comes a heavy improvement in the fine detail that is visible. Wow, some of the scenes look like they were filmed only a couple years ago in black and white. The detail is amazing. From individual hairs on people's heads to the faint stubble on some of the main characters.

Comparing this to the DVD is no contest. It's completely and totally worth the upgrade. Where the DVD was almost just black and white, the Blu-ray offers a completely different more realistic picture that fans have been clamoring for. When deep blacks are applied to the picture they appear perfectly inky with adding detailed shadows that are never crushing.

If there's one complaint it's source noise. It's expected that there be some source noise due to age, but take the episode "Escape Clause" for example. The source noise runs rampant during that entire episode, especially during the opening scenes where the devil is making his deal for the man's soul. The noise comes in all shapes and sizes, from tiny white flecks to larger ones that appear to be hair or some other foreign object that found its way onto the film. There is a layer of grain to the picture, but it only adds to its realism and filmic look.

Barring the source noise, the rest of this video presentation is downright brilliant. It's free from technical anomalies like blocking, aliasing, or banding. The noise can be looked over since the rest of the presentation is wonderful. Kudos on the work you put into this fine presentation Image Entertainment. They've really shown here that they care deeply about the fans of this show and have provided a top-notch video presentation to please each and every one of us.

The Audio: Rating the Sound

'The Twilight Zone' on Blu-ray comes complete with a restored 2.0 uncompressed PCM mono track. Using the two front channels only this audio gives us a surprisingly lively soundfield, which is able to handle all of the dialogue, musical soundtrack, and sound effects without skipping a beat. From Serling's tight-lipped introduction, to his always fantastic conclusions the audio on this release shines.

Dialogue is presented cleanly through the front channels. Dialogue is always audible and never muffled. All sound is presented in the two front channels giving the presentation a feeling of directionality even though the same audio is being pumped through both channels. The famous musical soundtrack is given ample room to breathe, adding suspense to every scene. It's really nice that they didn't try and force a surround sound experience out of this. I'm glad they stuck with the 2.0 presentation and didn't risk it sounding totally unrealistic had they remixed the track for a 5.1 arrangement.

There are a few episodes that feature some hissing in the soundtrack, one of them being the episode "Judgment Night." Like the source noise in the video presentation, hiccups like this are to be expected. If the hissing continued throughout the entire season then we'd have real problems, but it seems that it's only isolated to a few of the episodes.

While the audio portion doesn't offer as much of a jaw-dropping production as the newly restored video does, it holds its own and offers us the best sound 'Twilight Zone' we can have on home video at the moment.

The Supplements: Digging Into the Good Stuff

The special features on this set are extensive to say the least. I would almost use the word "overwhelming" to describe all the features this set contains. While I adore Image Entertainment's willingness to provide for the fans, this feels a little like special feature overload. They've set the bar high though, so it means that if they start skimping on extras on the subsequent releases, people are going to get mad.

Since the features are categorized in the menu under each episode I'm going to divide them here by discs and then episodes.

Note: In order to get this review up in a timely fashion, I couldn't listen to each and every audio commentary in its entirety. In order to get this review to all of you great readers before next year, I sampled portions of the numerous commentaries, and overall, they offer great wells of information about each and every episode. The commentaries where Serling is lecturing at Sherman Oaks College are fascinating, but hard to hear.

Disc 1

Episode 1: "Where is Everybody?"

  • Original Pilot Episode: "Where is Everybody?" with Rod Serling Pitch (SD, 35 min.) – This is the unaired Pilot version of the first episode of the series.
  • Alternate Opening Narration by Rod Serling (SD, 1 min.) – An alternate opening is featured with Rod Serling.
  • Alternate Closing Narration by Rod Serling (SD, 2 min.) – Along with the alternate opening is an alternate closing narration by Serling.
  • Audio Commentary – Producer William Self offers the commentary here. He talks about the beginning of the series and about how "Where is Everybody?" started it all.
  • Rod Serling Discusses "Where is Everybody?" at Sherwood Oaks College in 1975 – There are a few of these throughout the season. These tracks play along with the actual episode as an audio commentary. At times they are very hard to hear, and the questions the people in the audience are asking are damn near impossible to understand.
  • Audio Commentary – This commentary is provided by actor Earl Holliman. He's the man who finds himself stuck in a town he doesn't know where no one seems to be. It's interesting hearing the actors reminisce about their time on the show. Holliman offers a great commentary of what it would have been like to shoot an episode of 'The Twilight Zone.'
  • Sponsor Billboard (HD, 16 sec.) – These features are sprinkled throughout the season showing the different sponsors of the show. This one is for a brand of coffee.

Episode 2: "One for the Angels"

  • Sponsor Billboard (HD, 17 sec.) – Advertisement for the Kimberly Clark company.

Episode 3: "Mr. Denton on Doomsday"

  • Audio Commentary – This commentary is provided by actor Martin Landau who plays the mean cowboy who antagonizes the drunk gunslinger to sing to him for a drink.
  • Sponsor Billboard (HD, 16 sec.) – Another advert for coffee.

Episode 4: "The Sixteen Millimeter Shrine"

  • Sponsor Billboard(HD, 34 sec.) – Another advertisement for the Kimberly Clark company.

Episode 5: "Walking Distance"

  • Rod Serling Discusses "Walking Distance" at Sherwood Oaks College in 1975 – Another lecture that's played as an audio commentary. These are interesting to listen to because Serling sounds slightly different. Like he puts on a different voice for his TV appearances. Anyway, this again is really hard to hear when people are asking him questions. When he starts answering unheard questions it's easy to get lost.
  • Alternate Audio Mix – There's an alternate audio mix presented here. It's in 2.0 uncompressed linear PCM.
  • Isolated Music Score by Bernard Herrmann – Listen to the isolated music score for the episode. These features are also sprinkled here and there throughout.

Episode 6: "Escape Clause"

  • Isolated Music Score – Another episode where you can listen to the isolated foreboding music score.

Episode 7: "The Lonely"

  • Sponsor Billboard (HD, 16 sec.) – Coffee advertisement.

Disc 2

Episode 8: "Time Enough at Last"

  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Burgess Meredith from 1978 – This interview plays as a normal audio commentary as the episode plays. Marc Scott Zicree is a famed 'Twilight Zone' historian and wrote "The Twilight Zone Compainon," which was a detailed history of the show. Zicree interviews actor Burgess Meredith who recounts his time as the book addict who just wanted a world where all he could do was read.

Episode 11: "And When the Sky Was Opened"

  • Audio Commentary – This audio commentary is provided by Rod Taylor. Taylor talks about his time on 'The Twilight Zone' playing Col. Clegg Forbes who is faced with the fact that no one knows who he is now after returning from a space flight.
  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Dougles Hayes from 1978 – Like the Burgess interview this interview also plays during the episode as an audio commentary. Historian Zicree interviews director Douglas Heyes.
  • Rod Serling Discusses "And When the Sky Was Opened" at Sherwood Oaks College in 1975 – Plays along with the episode as a commentary like the other ones. Still pretty hard to hear, but interesting to listen to. Turn up the volume.

Disc 3

Episode 21: "Mirror Image"

  • Audio Commentary – This commentary is provided by Martin Milner who plays Paul Grinstead in this episode.

Disc 4

Episode 24: "Long Live Walter Jameson"

  • Audio Commentary – This commentary is given by Kevin McCarthy who plays the lead in this episode of Walter Jameson.

    Episode 25: "People Are Alike All Over"

  • Isolated Music Score – Like the others this feature allows you to listen to the isolated music score.

Episode 30: "A Stop at Willoughby"

  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Buck Houghton from 1978 – Zicree interviews producer Buck Houghton. Plays along with the episode as an audio commentary.

Disc 5

Episode 31: "The Chaser"

  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Douglas Heyes from 1978 – Here Zicree interviews director Douglas Heyes. Plays along with the episode as an audio commentary.

Episode 34: "The After Hours"

  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Anne Francis and Douglas Heyes from 1978 – Zicree interviews both actress Anne Francis and director Douglas Heyes. Plays along with the episode like all the rest of them, as an audio commentary.

Episode 36: "A World of His Own"

  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Richard Matheson from 1978 – Zicree interviews writer Richard Matheson on this audio commentary track and talks about the historical season finale of the first season.

Additional Feature

  • Emmy Clips (SD, 3 min.) – Check out Rod Serling accepting the Emmy for 'The Twilight Zone.'

HD Bonus Content: Any Exclusive Goodies in There?

Don't worry I know what you were thinking. There were some episodes missing above that didn't have any features attached. Well Image has gone through and added a massive amount of Blu-ray exclusive extras that build on the already substantial list of extras above. Take a breath, because here we go again.

Disc 1

Episode 1: "Where is Everybody?"

  • Isolated Music Score by Bernard Herrmann – Listen to the isolated music score on the first episode. This is one of many features that are provided to round out the special features on this set.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring John Schneider (Dolby Digital 2.0, 44 min.) – Now these are cool! Listen to the radio dramas on certain episodes throughout the season. As the radio episode plays still HD quality pictures from the episode appear.

Episode 2: "One for the Angels"

  • Interview with Dana Dillaway (SD, 5 min.) – Actress Dana Dillaway worked on a couple 'Twilight Zone' episodes, but this one in particular.
  • Audio Commentary – This commentary is provided by author and film historian Gary Gerani.
  • Isolated Music Score – Another episode where you're allowed to listen to the isolated music score.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Ed Begley, Jr. (Dolby Digital 2.0, 37 min.) – Another fantastic radio show this time with the great voice of Ed Begley Jr. leading the way.

Episode 3: "Mr. Denton on Doomsday"

  • Isolated Music Score – Listen to the isolated music score here.

Episode 4: "The Sixteen Milimeter Shrine"

  • Isolated Music Score by Franz Waxman – More isolated music for your listening enjoyment.

Episode 5: "Walking Distance"

  • Audio Commentary by Marc Scott Zicree – This is one of the two audio commentaries provided on this fan favorite.
  • Audio Commentary by Steven C. Smith, John Morgan, William T. Stromberg – This is the other commentary provided. This commentary is all about the music of the episode as it features Steven C. Smith, John Morgan, and William T. Stromberg all of which are music historians.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Chelcie Ross (Dolby Digital 2.0, 35 min.) – More radio shows to add to the collection. This one is perfect since "Walking Distance" is such a fan favorite. I never get tired of listening to the radio shows.

Episode 6: "Escape Clause"

  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Mike Starr (Dolby Digital 2.0, 42 min.) – The radio shows just keep piling up. This one is among my favorites of the set. I hope that when people get this set they are excited to here these radio shows that have been provided as a Blu-ray exclusive.

Episode 7: "The Lonely"

  • Audio Commentary by Marc Scott Zicree – Brand new commentary provided by 'Twilight Zone' expert Zicree.
  • Audio Commentary by Steven C. Smith, John Morgan, William T. Stromberg – Another music-centric commentary provided by the trio.
  • Audio Commentary by Gary Gerani – Rounding out the new commentaries on this episode is one from Gary Gerani.
  • Isolated Music Score by Bernard Herrmann – Watch "The Lonely" with an isolated music score.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Mike Starr (Dolby Digital 2.0, 42 min.) – Listen to the radio version of "The Lonely." You won't be disappointed.

Disc 2

Episode 8: "Time Enough at Last"

  • Audio Commentary by Marc Scott Zicree – Zicree provides a brand new commentary.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Tim Kazurinsky (Dolby Digital 2.0, 39 min.) – This fan favorite is accompanied by a Blu-ray exclusive radio show that shouldn't be missed.

Episode 9: "Perchance to Dream"

  • Interview with Suzanne Lloyd (SD, 10 min.) – Actress Suzanne Lloyd is interviewed about her role as the cat woman.
  • Isolated Music Score by Van Cleave – More isolated music for the fans.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Fred Willard (Dolby Digital 2.0, 38 min.) – Yes, indeed, it's the Fred Willard from 'Anchorman' doing this radio show. He went on to do four 'Twilight Zone' radio shows altogether.

Episode 11: "And When the Sky Was Opened"

  • Isolated Music Score by Leonard Rosenman – The sole Blu-ray exclusive on this episode allows for an isolated music score experience.

Episode 12: "What You Need"

  • 'Tales of Tomorrow' "What You Need" Episode (SD, 30 min.) – This shows you the 'Tales of Tomorrow' episode of "What You Need." 'Tales of Tomorrow' was a science fiction series that preceded 'The Twilight Zone.' It's fun to see how the episodes differ from one another.
  • Isolated Music Score – An isolated music score is provided on here too.

Episode 13: "The Four of Us Are Dying"

  • Interview with Beverly Garland – Actress Beverly Garland is interviewed here.
  • Audio Commentary by Gary Gerani – Gerani offers a thoughtful commentary on this episode.
  • Isolated Music Score by Jerry Goldsmith – More isolated music for the music lovers out there.

Episode 14: "Third from the Sun"

  • Audio Commentary by David Simkins and Marc Scott Zicree – Writer/producer David Simkins and Zicree offer up one of the rare commentaries that doesn't have Zicree talking by himself.
  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Richard L. Bare from 1978 – Zicree interviews Richard L. Bare in 1978 about his role as director in "Third from the Sun." Like the other interviews this one plays along with the episode as an audio commentary.
  • Isolated Music Score – Another isolated music score rounds out the features on this episode.

Episode 15: "I Shot an Arrow into the Air"

  • Isolated Music Score – An isolated music score is provided for episode 15.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Chelcie Ross (Dolby Digital 2.0, 36 min.) – More radio shows to delight my heart. Man I love these, each and every one of them.

Disc 3

Episode 16: "The Hitch-Hiker"

  • Audio Commentary by Marc Scott Zicree – Zircee offers up another brand new commentary featuring himself.
  • Isolated Music Score – Isolate the music score on "The Hitch-Hiker" for a different sound experience.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Kate Jackson (Dolby Digital 2.0, 40 min) – "The Hitch-Hiker" gets the radio treatment with this great radio episode starring Kate Jackson.

Episode 17: "The Fever"

  • Isolated Music Score – The adding of isolated music scores continues.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Stacy Keach and Kathy Garver (Dolby Digital 2.0, 34 min.) – Stacy Keach and Kathy Garver provide another great installment in the radio show department for "The Fever."

Episode 18: "The Last Flight"

  • Isolated Music Score – More music for everyone! Hear "The Last Flight" with its music track isolated.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Charles Shaughnessy (Dolby Digital 2.0, 40 min.) – Charles Shaughnessy gives a great performance in this one with HD images from the episode providing even more entertainment.

Episode 19: "The Purple Testament"

  • Audio Commentary by William Reynolds – Actor William Reynolds talks about what it was like play Lt. Fitzgerald in "The Purple Testament."
  • Interview with Ron Masak – Actor Ron Masak provides us with a short interview about what it was like to work on this episode.
  • Isolated Music Score by Lucian Moraweck – Some more isolated music to delight your ears.

Episode 20: "Elegy"

  • Isolated Music Score Van Cleave – The sole HD extra on this episode is for an isolated music track.

Episode 21: "Mirror Image"

  • Audio Commentary by Martin Milner – Martin Milner talks about his role as Paul Grinstead and what it was like working opposite Vera Miles as Millicent Barnes who plays a woman that spots her doppelganger at a bus station.
  • Isolated Music Score – There's an isolated music score provided on this episode.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Frank John Hughes (Dolby Digital 2.0, 38 min.) – Frank John Hughes has a great performance in this radio edition for "Mirror Image."

Episode 22: "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street"

  • Audio Commentary by Marc Scott Zicree – Zicree offers up another commentary on this episode.
  • Isolated Music Score by Rene Garriguenc – More isolated music for you to enjoy.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Frank John Hughes (Dolby Digital 2.0, 34 min.) – Another great Frank John Hughes performance. While I liked "Mirror Image" just a little better from him, this one is really fun.

Disc 4

Episode 23: "A World of Difference"

  • Audio Commentary by Director Ted Post – Director Ted Post talks about what it was like directing this episode about a man who is confused as to whether he's a real person or an actor playing out a real person's life on a movie set.
  • Isolated Score by Van Cleave – Another isolated score for you.

Episode 24: "Long Live Walter Jameson"

  • Audio Commentary by Gary Gerani – Gerani offers up another interesting commentary, this time about Walter Jameson a history teacher who may have lived the very past he's been teaching his students.
  • Isolated Music Score – You know the drill by now. More music for you.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Lou Diamond Phillips (Dolby Digital 2.0, 47 min.) – Yeah I was surprised to see Lou Diamond Phillips credited as the person starring in this 'Twilight Zone' radio show. While it's not as good as the others, it stands its ground well.

Episode 25: "People Are Alike All Over"

  • Isolated Music Score – More isolated music.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Blair Underwood (Dolby Digital 2.0, 41 min.) – Blair Underwood gives a surprisingly engaging performance in "People Are Alike All Over." One of the better radio dramas included on this set.

Episode 26: "Execution"

  • Isolated Music Score – This is the only Blu-ray extra for this episode.

Episode 27: "The Big Tall Wish"

  • Isolated Music Score by Jerry Goldsmith – "The Big Tall Wish" is given an isolated music score for a Blu-ray extra.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Blair Underwood (Dolby Digital 2.0, 35 min.) – Underwood gives another fine performance. I'm really liking him as a narrator for these radio dramas.

Episode 28: "A Nice Place to Visit"

  • Isolated Music Score – This is the lone Blu-ray extra for this episode.

Episode 29: "Nightmare as a Child"

  • Isolated Music Score by Jerry Goldsmith – This musical score by Jerry Goldsmith is the only Blu-ray extra for "Nightmare as a Child."

Episode 30: "A Stop at Willoughby"

  • Audio Commentary by Gary Gerani – Gerani provides insightful commentary into this episode which features an advertising executive who buckles under the stress of his job and imagines a peaceful place called Willoughby.
  • 1977 Syndication Promo (HD, 32 sec.) – Get a peek at the syndication promo from 1977.
  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Buck Houghton from 1978 – Historian Marc Zircee interviews producer Buck Houghton here as it plays over the episode as a commentary track.
  • Isolated Music Score by Nathan Scott – An isolated music score has been added to "A Stop at Willoughby" to round out its impressive set of Blu-ray exclusives.

Disc 5

Episode 31: "The Chaser"

  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Douglas Heyes from 1978 – Zircee interviews director Douglas Heyes and talks to him about filming the episode "The Chaser."
  • Isolated Music Score – The isolated music score rounds out "The Chaser"s Blu-ray extras.

Episode 32: "A Passage for Trumpet"

  • Audio Commentary by Mark Fergus and Marc Scott Zicree – Zicree and Mark Fergus offer a nice, congenial commentary on this episode that features a trumpet player who is given a second chance at life after trying to commit suicide.
  • Audio Commentary by Gary Gerani – Gerani also offers a commentary on this fan favorite episode.
  • Isolated Music Score by Lyn Murray – An isolated music score is also provided.

Episode 33: "Mr. Bevis"

  • Isolated Music Score – This is this episode's only Blu-ray extra.

Episode 34: "The After Hours"

  • Audio Commentary by Marc Scott Zicree – Historian Zicree offers a commentary on "The After Hours."
  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Anne Francis and Douglas Heyes from 1978 – Playing out like an audio commentary Zicree interviews both director Douglas Heyes and actress Anne Francis about what it was like starring in and making this episode about a woman who buys a thimble from a mannequin.
  • 1977 Syndication Promo (HD, 32 sec.) – Another promo spot for syndication is provided here.
  • Isolated Music Score – This episode is also given a Blu-ray exclusive isolated music score.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Kim Fields (Dolby Digital 2.0, 40 min.) – Kim Fields offers an engaging radio show for "The After Hours."

Episode 35: "The Mighty Casey"

  • Rod Serling Discusses "The Mighty Casey" at Sherwood Oaks College in 1975 – Another great feature that plays like an audio commentary on the episode. Serling discusses the filming and the story. Again it's hard to hear, but most of these lectures are.
  • Isolated Music Score – Isolated score is provided here too.
  • "The Twilight Zone" Radio Drama starring Paul Dooley (Dolby Digital 2.0, 42 min.) – Another radio show to add to the growing collection on this set. I'm just kind of sad they didn't also come on a CD which I could take and play in my car on long drives.

Episode 36: "A World of His Own"

  • Marc Scott Zicree Interview with Richard Matheson from 1978 – Playing as an audio commentary Zicree interviews writer Richard Matheson who co-wrote this episode with Rod Serling.
  • Isolated Music Score – An isolated music score is provided for this episode also.

Additional Bonus Content

  • Bonus Episode: "The Time Element" (HD, 55 min.) – Desi Arnaz of Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse introduces this rarely scene episode of 'The Twilight Zone.' Written by Rod Serling this episode was meant to be the original pilot to the show. It's about a man who finds himself having a dream that he's travelling back in time getting closer and closer to the fateful date of December 6, 1941. This is a great feature for this set as it gives fans an episode they may have not seen yet.
  • Audio Commentary – Commentary for "The Time Element" is provided by Zicree.
  • Alternate Opening and Closing from the Syndicated Version of the Episode – Just like the title says. See the alternate opening and closing from the syndicated episode that made this episode appear more like the others.
  • Marc Scott Zicaree Audio Interview with George T. Clemens: Part 1 (37 min.) – This feature isn't like the other interviews that play during an episode. This is audio only and features George T. Clemens, who was the cinematographer on 'The Twilight Zone.'

That's an exhaustive list of Blu-ray extras. If I had to put a finger on my favorite Blu-ray exclusive it would be the awesome addition of the 18 radio dramas featured throughout the season. What a great feature to include. If there was a reason to upgrade from your DVDs to the Blu-rays (besides the amazing 1080p picture) these radio shows are it.

Final Thoughts

When I heard that Image Entertainment would finally be releasing 'The Twilight Zone' on Blu-ray I was excited to say the least. Like many other fans out there, I've wanted for years to see one of the best TV shows of all time come to high definition. Image Entertainment hasn't disappointed with their release. It features video I just never thought possible. These look amazing. Simply amazing. The restored 2.0 sound is also fantastic, and the extras just keep going and going. There are so many extras here that you may face extras overload like I did, but hand it to Image for not skimping. They've pulled out all the stops to release season one of the 'The Twilight Zone' the best way possible. This is one of the best Blu-ray releases of the year and quite possibly one of the best catalog releases in the history of Blu-ray. This is a must own for sure.

Technical Specs

  • BD-50
  • 5 Disc Set

Video Resolution/Codec

  • 1080p/AVC MPEG-4

Aspect Ratio(s)

  • 1.33:1

Audio Formats

  • 2.0 uncompressed PCM mono track

Subtitles/Captions

  • English

Supplements

  • An overwhelming number of extras.

Exclusive HD Content

  • TONS of HD exclusives too, including fantastic radio plays!

All disc reviews at High-Def Digest are completed using the best consumer HD home theater products currently on the market. More about our gear.

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